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Speech to Okaloosa County North FL Victims' Rights Tribute Sponsored Okaloosa County Victims Services. April 8, 2004

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Victims Participate and Voices Heard
By Pat Tuthill, Victim Activist/Advocate

My daughter Peyton Stephanie Tuthill graduated from FWBHS and was blessed with many gifts that she freely shared with everyone she met. She had joy, wit and wisdom beyond her years. The magic of her eyes, smile and contagious laughter drew others to her. After graduation here, she went to Charleston, SC to attend the College of Charleston. Peyton was involved with and volunteered with many charities and loved working with the elderly and Alzheimer patients through her music therapy in nursing homes. One of her greatest joy was working with a family of 5 children during her 5 years in Charleston, SC. She was a mentor to these children and thought of them as part of her family. One her special joys in life was sharing her blessings with others to make their life just a little bit better by giving back. After graduating from the college, Peyton decided to test her wings.

I always taught my daughters to work hard and follow their dreams. We try to teach our children to grow up and be independent young adults. I thought I had done everything right. Peyton decided to move to Denver to attend graduate school and work. On the morning of February 24, 1999, she interviewed with the Cystic Fibrosis Association for a low paying position for the organization and was so excited with the thought of working with for an organization whose purpose is to improve the quality of life of others. Peyton returned home at noon to let out her springier spaniel, Maggie, and change clothes to return to her temporary job. Peyton did not know she would never leave the house again. She walked in through the front door and at the back door a young man broke into her house. She did not know him. They struggled and he left her badly bruised and tied in electric cord. He decided he did not want to leave a witness and returned to her house just a few minutes later and he took her young life.

The homicide of my beautiful young daughter, Peyton Stephanie Tuthill in 1999 left me a victim of every parent's worst fear. I became a member of an elite organization Parents of Murdered Children. The price of membership is too high, a price that no one wants to pay.

Peyton's family was very special to her, especially her sister and grandparents. I had two choices to live or die and contemplated each very carefully. Most importantly, I was still blessed with Peyton's younger sister, whom she loved very much, and was, also, the love of my life and the rest of my family. The answer became clear, that I must find a way to go on and be a mother to Cara because to take my own life would have allowed the killer to also take my life, Cara's and the rest of my family. I have not done a very good job of being a mother and parent to Cara during the past 5 years, but I am learning once again how to be there for her. I remind myself our lives were forever changed and we both learn everyday.
I now refer to myself as a survivor of homicide and have found passion, purpose and hope in my commitment to promote public safety and protect the rights of victims through public awareness, education, legislation, accountability and most of all working with our children and youth.

When we face tragedy of whatever kind and degree we must slowly learn how to face our adversity and circumstances. Victims of crime come from all different backgrounds and races and so do offenders. If you are a victim, survivor, or family member or friend of someone who has been victimized, be patient. Logic and rationale behavior is not possible at times. We deal with fear, anger, sadness, pain, depression, anxiety, loss and grief. If you are in law enforcement, judiciary, criminal justice or an allied professional, please listen and allow victims to vent and express their feelings. Through my own personal experiences, I found those who treated me with compassion and allowed me to vent and did not take my rage as a personal attack became my mentors, champions and advocates in my fight for justice and change.

After learning of the circumstances leading to Peyton's death I began working legislation 5 years ago that took me throughout the country and it has now been passed in 48 states plus the District of Columbia. It controls how probationers, parolees and other offenders are supervised and are transferred throughout the country. It is not perfect but the new Compact reduces the risk of others being victimized or killed as Peyton was. The legislation in Florida was sponsored by Former State Representative, Jerry Melvin and Senator Charlie Clary. It was signed into law June 13, 2001. I am forever grateful that they listened and responded.

The legislation is known at the Interstate Compact for Adult Offender Supervision and becomes effective throughout the country August 1 this year. Last year the Peyton Tuthill award was established by the National Commission, made up of Commissioners from all states. The national award will be presented annually to a legislator, governor, victim advocate or citizen who demonstrates commitment to public safety and protecting the rights of victims. Last year the recipient was Senator Denton Darrington from Idaho, the first state to pass the Compact.

Similar legislation is now being introduced and enacted across the across the nation regarding supervision and transfers of juveniles among states.

Working with juvenile justice and speaking to adolescents and sometimes children about their behavior, crimes, and consequences is one more step towards prevention. If one seed can be planted with one young person, it may grow and spread a message to others. I will never know for sure if one young life is touched by my message, but I know if I do nothing then nothing changes. Our children's choices will shape the quality of their lives our lives. We must realize they are our hope for the future. How we treat our children and teach them is one key to turning their lives away from crime. Crime prevention is victim prevention.

Victims voices must be heard as stories of victims, families and communities are told about them living in fear of offenders re-victimizing them or threatening the safety of my loved ones or yours.

Many organizations are represented here today with information for you if you or someone you know has been victimized by crime. Victims make a difference in the process, as policymakers and victims learn how to collaborate for the protection of all. Through collaboration and unity we can continue to have an active role in the quality of life for our families and communities.

To see a rainbow we first have to see the rain, Peyton Tuthill





 2005 Report to National Commission


Interstate Compact for Adutl Supervison 2005 Annual Report to governors and legislators
By Pat Tuthill, Ex-Officio Victims' Representative



As a representative of the American Parole and Probation Association Victims Issues Committee, I am able to represent to the Interstate Commission victims? voices from throughout the country and assure that all stakeholders are informed and have representation in the promulgation of rules and policy affecting the quality of life for our communities. History has demonstrated why it is necessary to put emphasis on the importance of knowing where offenders are at all times to promote public safety and to protect the rights of victims.

The new compact was passed with the purpose of being able to better monitor the movement of offenders, to manage victim notifications and provide for rehabilitation of offenders and re-entry as the ultimate way of keeping our communities safe. Victims live in fear of being re-victimized by the offender. Through the Information Technology Committee experts were brought together to design and develop a web-based application that is vital to the success of the compact. Victims will be able to access a public database that will provide the contact information of the supervising Interstate Compact office as well as the contact information for the supervising office that has responsibility for supervision of the offender. Having access to this information will provide another opportunity for victims to remain informed and be heard.

The challenge victims have faced is to establish a unified process and position to further advance public safety policy when transferring offenders across state borders. The formation of state councils with victim representation provides another significant avenue in meeting the challenge for victims and all stakeholders to be informed and participate in decisions that are made affecting public safety policies, victim notification and opportunities for offender rehabilitation and reentry into our communities.

In addition to Commissioners at the October 2004 annual meeting of the Commission, there was record attendance of compact administrators, deputy administrators and other criminal justice professionals underscoring the significance of the Commission and its mission. As with the implementation of any new legislation and regulations, it is critical to consider the recommendations of officials and professionals in the field and victim advocates to determine if the process is working as envisioned and to make appropriate changes as necessary. Commissioners are responding with willingness and commitment to see that the movement of offenders from one state or territory to another is managed with seamless supervision.

Through collaboration and unity victims can continue partner with policymakers and law enforcement to have an active role in the quality of life for our families and communities.


2005 Annual Report for National Commission

Passing the ICAOS and Establishing Rules
Victims Participate and Voices Heard
By Pat Tuthill, Ex-officio Victims' Representative


  • The ICAOS bylaws adopted at the Inaugural Commission meeting in November 2002 stated the purpose of the compact is to provide a framework for the promotion of public safety and protect the rights of victims through the control and regulation of the interstate movement of offenders in the community and manage the movement between states of adults placed under supervision and released to the community. In addition to a commissioner from each state, ex-officio representatives are also members of the Commission. Victims? issues and concerns are represented by an ex-officio victim representative. I was honored to be appointed to this position. As an ex-officio member of the commission, I also serve on several committees; executive, rules, drafting, and training.

    During the first eighteen months of compact operations, victims have played a major role in the development of rules. We were able to express our concerns, participate in discussions and make recommendations. The commissioners listened to us, just as governors and legislators listened when we campaigned and testified for passage of the new compact. Rules were made with consideration and recommendations given by state council victims? representatives, victim advocates, victim assistance program directors, the American Parole and Probation Association victims? issues committee as well as other victim organizations. Our voices were heard when we told of how victims, families and communities live in fear of offenders re-victimizing them or threaten public safety.

    Commission bylaws require that each state establish a state council with victims representation. Many states have established their councils and have met within the past 18 months. For those states that have not established their councils, it is imperative this be done as soon as possible. With victims serving on the state councils, victims will continue to have the opportunity to serve in an advisory capacity regarding policymaking decisions that will directly impact how offenders are released, transferred and supervised in their state and community. Only victims can truly represent the "passion" lawmakers must hear to advocate for public safety. During the next year my plan is to establish a cohesive network of the victims' representatives serving on the state councils. Through collaboration and unity we can continue to have an active role in the quality of life for our families and communities.

    Commissioners demonstrated commitment to public safety and victims during the rulemaking process. In a "one size fits all" compact, commissioners faced many challenges in making and voting on rules. The rule makers acted to establish rules for victims to be notified and to have the right to comment and be heard. Significant legislation is now in place that directly affects the quality of life for all of us and may make a difference in life and death. Victims make a difference in the process as policymakers and victims learn to collaborate for the protection of all.



    American Parole and Probation Association  Victims Issues Committee Report  February 2004

    Passing the ICAOS and Establishing Rules Victims Participate and Voices Heard
    By Pat Tuthill, Ex-officio Victim's Representative

    The ICAOS bylaws adopted at the Inaugural Commission meeting in November 2002 stated the purpose of the compact is to provide a framework for the promotion of public safety and protect the rights of victims through the control and regulation of the interstate movement of offenders in the community and manage the movement between states of adults placed under supervision and released to the community. In addition to a commissioner from each state, ex-officio representatives are also members of the Commission.

    Victims issues and concerns are represented by an ex-officio victim representative. 47 states and the District of Columbia are signatories to the compact. Mississippi, Massachusetts and Virginia are not members, but it is anticipated that these states will be party to the compact this year. Puerto Rico is actively working to introduce and pass the legislation.

    During the first eighteen months of compact operations, victims have played a major role in the development of rules. We were able to express concern, participate in discussions and make recommendations. The commissioners listened to us, just a governors and legislators listened when we campaigned and testified letting them know how victims, families and communities are impacted by crime.

    Among the issues to be addressed within twelve months after the first meeting was notice to victims and the opportunity to be heard, eligibility for transfer, collection of restitution, protection orders, and offender registration and compliance. Rules were adopted regarding these issues at the November 2003 Annual Commission meeting. Through the ex-officio victims' representative and commissioners, victims had a significant role in the development and promulgation of ICAOS rules.

    Misdemeanant supervision and eligibility for transfer under the compact is a major concern and rules are being redrafted to be presented to commissioners for passage. The rule that passed at the annual meeting, November 2003 states "that all misdemeanants will be supervised. The new rule as drafted will not require supervision of all misdemeanants. Attached.

    Victims'  voices have been heard with the adoption of the rules, particularly rules covering:

    Victim right to notification when an offender transfers to another state by notifying known victims through the State's notification authority in accordance with its own laws.


    APPA Victims Issue Committee Report
    February 13, 2005
     Interstate Compact for Adult Offender Supervision (ICAOS)
    By Pat Tuthill

    Additional funding is required to complete Phases II and III of the national database. The APPA Victims' Issues committee can provide support and influence for seeing that this project is funded by submitting a letter of support to Senator Arlen Specter, Chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee and requesting that funds are appropriated for its development under the 2004 reauthorization grant program of the Department of Justice for reentry of offenders into the community.

    The new compact was passed with the purpose of being able to better monitor the movement of offenders, to manage victim notifications, provide for rehabilitation of offenders and reentry as the ultimate way of keeping our communities safe. Under the leadership of Commission Chair, David Guntharp and Executive Director, Don Blackburn the ICOAS Information Technology committee brought together experts in corrections and information management as well as field officers to design and develop a web-based application that is vital to the success of the compact.

    Phase I  - Database

    This will be operational in July 2005 and has been funded by the National Commission. The initial development provides a system that ensures timely and accurate information is available to protect the public and notify victims.

    Public Access
    Victims will have access to information on offenders with active supervision cases
    Conact information for the supervising Interstate Compact office
    Contact information for the supervising field
    State where offender resides
    Having access to this information will provide another opportunity for victims to remain informed and be heard.

    Centralization of Offender Information
    Transfer Packets containing offender?s application and request to transfer
    Violation and progress reports
    Investigation information
    Victimm Sensitive notation

    Benefits
    Correct information and produce statistical evidence
    Monitor and enforce compliance
    Minimize risk of offenders unaccounted for (lost and dropping through the cracks)

    Phase II and III  Database Expansion

    The objective of the remaining database expansion is to provide an information exchange system that will be shared among criminal justice and law enforcement agencies and victim notification authorities to better serve public safety. The vision is to be able to work with public agencies and serve all victims and protect those who have been traumatized by crime, particularly domestic violence and sexual offenses. This objective becomes increasingly important as 97% of those incarcerated return to our communities and we look to community corrections for successful reentry solutions.

    The ICOAS rules committee will be addressing the issue of a matrix or risk assessment supervision system to determine foreseeable risk to the community and how case management resources are best utilized in protecting the public. The committee will also look at issues referred by the Commission at the October 2004 annual meeting regarding treatment programs, temporary travel, and transfer of college students.

    It is my pleasure and honor to serve on the APPA Victim Issues Committee and as Ex-Officio Victims' Representative ICAOS


    APPA Victims Issues Committee August 2003

    THE NEW INTERSTATE COMPACT FOR ADULT OFFENDER SUPERVISION
    by Pat Tuthill*

    "The great thing in this world is not where you stand, as in what direction you are moving." (Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., 1841-1935)

    Since 1937 the Interstate Compact for the Supervision of Parolees and Probationers has provided the sole statutory for regulating the transfer of adult parole and probation supervision across state boundaries. The compact governs the travel, movement, and supervision of adult probationers and parolees from a sending state, where the convicts have been convicted, to a receiving state. The compact has virtually unchanged from its inception. When the Compact was enacted there were approximately 1,000 offenders eligible to participate in the Compact. Today, an estimated 250,000 offenders are crossing state lines. Provisions of the 1937 compact were inadequate for maintaining control of this offender population and needed to be repealed and replaced, leading to the enactment of the new legislation.

    The new Interstate Compact for Adult Offender Supervision has been enacted with the required number of states passing the legislation. The new Compact is ultimately about public safety and providing structure and framework for controlled movement and offenders across state boundaries. Florida enacted the legislation in June 2001. Now that the required number of states has adopted the law, the new Compact's national implementation is under way and it will go into effect November 18, 2003. Support for the new Compact includes corrections, victims, all three branches of government and the Council of State Governments (CSG). The first meeting of the new Interstate Compact Commission, the National Commission, was held in Phoenix, AZ in November 2002. Subsequently, the Executive Committee has appointed committees to carry out critical formative duties on behalf of the Commission. The Commission, the national governing authority, will meet annually to elect the compact operating authority.

    The primary goals of the new Interstate Compact include:
    Regulating the movement and supervision of offenders throughout our nation, protecting and preserving the rights of victims. Accountability by states, enhanced through new enforcement provisions included in the Compact.

    Policy-making level appointment representations of all member states on a national governing commission that meets annually to elect the compact operating authorities members. Each state will appoint a commissioner who will have one vote at the National Interstate Commission. The Commission is responsible for developing Compact rules and regulations. Commission members elect an executive committee to appoint working committees, employ staff and carry out critical formative duties on behalf of the Commission.


    Submitted to the Florida Department of Juvenile Justice for Victims' Rights Week - April 2, 2004

    Victims Participate and Voices Heard
    By Pat Tuthill, Victim Activist/Advocate

    The murder of my beautiful young daughter, Peyton Stephanie Tuthill in 1999 left me a victim of every parent?s worst fear. I became a member of an elite organization Parent?s of Murdered Children. The price of membership is too high, a price that no one wants to pay. During the last 5 years I have become a survivor of homicide and found passion, purpose and hope in my commitment to promote public safety and protect the rights of victims through public awareness, education, legislation, accountability and most of all working with our children and youth.

    Working with juvenile justice and speaking to adolescents and sometimes children about their behavior, crimes, and consequences is one more step towards prevention. If one seed can be planted with one young person, it may grow and spread a message to others. I will never know for sure if one young life is touched by my message, but I know if I do nothing then nothing changes. Our children?s choices will shape the quality of our lives. We must realize they are our hope for the future. How we treat our children and teach them is one key to turning their lives away from crime. Crime prevention is victim prevention.

    Legislation I began working on 5 years ago has now been passed in 48 states plus the District of Columbia to control how probationers and parolees are supervised and are transferred throughout the country. Similar legislation is now in progress across the nation regarding supervision and transfers of juveniles among states.

    Victims' voices must be heard as stories of victims, families and communities live in fear of offenders re-victimizing them or threaten the safety of my loved ones or yours.

    Victims make a difference in the process, as policymakers and victims learn how to collaborate for the protection of all. Through collaboration and unity we can continue to have an active role in the quality of life for our families and communities.

    We must go through the rain storms to see the rainbows, Peyton Tuthill


    Speaking

    Speech Okaloosa County, North FL Victims' Rights Tribute Sponsored Okaloosa County Victims' Services. April 8, 2004

    Victims Participate and Voices Heard
    By Pat Tuthill, Victim Activist/Advocate

    My daughter Peyton Stephanie Tuthill graduated from FWBHS and was blessed with many gifts that she freely shared with everyone she met. She had joy, wit and wisdom beyond her years. The magic of her eyes, smile and contagious laughter drew others to her. After graduation here, she went to Charleston, SC to attend the College of Charleston. Peyton was involved with and volunteered with many charities and loved working with the elderly and Alzheimer patients through her music therapy in nursing homes. One of her greatest joy was working with a family of 5 children during her 5 years in Charleston, SC. She was a mentor to these children and thought of them as part of her family. One her special joys in life was sharing her blessings with others to make their life just a little bit better by giving back. After graduating from the college, Peyton decided to test her wings.

    I always taught my daughters to work hard and follow their dreams. We try to teach our children to grow up and be independent young adults. I thought I had done everything right. Peyton decided to move to Denver to attend graduate school and work. On the morning of February 24, 1999, she interviewed with the Cystic Fibrosis Association for a low paying position for the organization and was so excited with the thought of working with for an organization whose purpose is to improve the quality of life of others. Peyton returned home at noon to let out her springier spaniel, Maggie, and change clothes to return to her temporary job. Peyton did not know she would never leave the house again. She walked in through the front door and at the back door a young man broke into her house. She did not know him. They struggled and he left her badly bruised and tied in electric cord. He decided he did not want to leave a witness and returned to her house just a few minutes later and he took her young life.

    The homicide of my beautiful young daughter, Peyton Stephanie Tuthill in 1999 left me a victim of every parent's worst fear. I became a member of an elite organization Parent's of Murdered Children. The price of membership is too high, a price that no one wants to pay.

    Peyton's family was very special to her, especially her sister and grandparents. I had two choices to live or die and contemplated each very carefully. Most importantly, I was still blessed with Peyton's younger sister, whom she loved very much, and was, also, the love of my life and the rest of my family. The answer became clear, that I must find a way to go on and be a mother to Cara because to take my own life would have allowed the killer to also take my life, Cara's and the rest of my family. I have not done a very good job of being a mother and parent to Cara during the past 5 years, but I am learning once again how to be there for her. I remind myself our lives were forever changed and we both learn everyday.
    I now refer to myself as a survivor of homicide and have found passion, purpose and hope in my commitment to promote public safety and protect the rights of victims through public awareness, education, legislation, accountability and most of all working with our children and youth.

    When we face tragedy of whatever kind and degree we must slowly learn how to face our adversity and circumstances. Victims of crime come from all different backgrounds and races and so do offenders. If you are a victim, survivor, or family member or friend of someone who has been victimized, be patient. Logic and rationale behavior is not possible at times. We deal with fear, anger, sadness, pain, depression, anxiety, loss and grief. If you are in law enforcement, judiciary, criminal justice or an allied professional, please listen and allow victims to vent and express their feelings. Through my own personal experiences, I found those who treated me with compassion and allowed me to vent and did not take my rage as a personal attack became my mentors, champions and advocates in my fight for justice and change.

    After learning of the circumstances leading to Peyton's death I began working legislation 5 years ago that took me throughout the country and it has now been passed in 48 states plus the District of Columbia. It controls how probationers, parolees and other offenders are supervised and are transferred throughout the country. It is not perfect but the new Compact reduces the risk of others being victimized or killed as Peyton was. The legislation in Florida was sponsored by Former State Representative, Jerry Melvin and Senator Charlie Clary. It was signed into law June 13, 2001. I am forever grateful that they listened and responded.

    The legislation is known at the Interstate Compact for Adult Offender Supervision and becomes effective throughout the country August 1 this year. Last year the Peyton Tuthill award was established by the National Commission, made up of Commissioners from all states. The national award will be presented annually to a legislator, governor, victim advocate or citizen who demonstrates commitment to public safety and protecting the rights of victims. Last year the recipient was Senator Denton Darrington from Idaho, the first state to pass the Compact.

    Similar legislation is now being introduced and enacted across the across the nation regarding supervision and transfers of juveniles among states.

    Working with juvenile justice and speaking to adolescents and sometimes children about their behavior, crimes, and consequences is one more step towards prevention. If one seed can be planted with one young person, it may grow and spread a message to others. I will never know for sure if one young life is touched by my message, but I know if I do nothing then nothing changes. Our children?s choices will shape the quality of their lives our lives. We must realize they are our hope for the future. How we treat our children and teach them is one key to turning their lives away from crime. Crime prevention is victim prevention.

    Victims' voices must be heard as stories of victims, families and communities are told about them living in fear of offenders re-victimizing them or threatening the safety of my loved ones or yours.

    Many organizations are represented here today with information for you if you or someone you know has been victimized by crime. Victims make a difference in the process, as policymakers and victims learn how to collaborate for the protection of all. Through collaboration and unity we can continue to have an active role in the quality of life for our families and communities.

    To see a rainbow we first have to see the rain, Peyton Tuthill

    Report 2




2004 Annual Report for National Commission


Passing the ICAOS and Establishing Rules
Victims Participate and Voices Heard
By Pat Tuthill, Ex-officio Victims' Representative

The ICAOS bylaws adopted at the Inaugural Commission meeting in November 2002 stated the purpose of the compact is to provide a framework for the promotion of public safety and protect the rights of victims through the control and regulation of the interstate movement of offenders in the community and manage the movement between states of adults placed under supervision and released to the community. In addition to a commissioner from each state, ex-officio representatives are also members of the Commission. Victims issues and concerns are represented by an ex-officio victim representative. I was honored to be appointed to this position. As an ex-officio member of the commission, I also serve on several committees; executive, rules, drafting, and training.

During the first eighteen months of compact operations, victims have played a major role in the development of rules. We were able to express our concerns, participate in discussions and make recommendations. The commissioners listened to us, just as governors and legislators listened when we campaigned and testified for passage of the new compact. Rules were made with consideration and recommendations given by state council victims' representatives, victim advocates, victim assistance program directors, the American Parole and Probation Association victims' issues committee as well as other victim organizations. Our voices were heard when we told of how victims, families and communities live in fear of offenders re-victimizing them or threaten public safety.

Commission bylaws require that each state establish a state council with victims representation. Many states have established their councils and have met within the past 18 months. For those states that have not established their councils, it is imperative this be done as soon as possible. With victims serving on the state councils, victims will continue to have the opportunity to serve in an advisory capacity regarding policymaking decisions that will directly impact how offenders are released, transferred and supervised in their state and community. Only victims can truly represent the "passion" lawmakers must hear to advocate for public safety. During the next year my plan is to establish a cohesive network of the victims representatives serving on the state councils. Through collaboration and unity we can continue to have an active role in the quality of life for our families and communities.

Commissioners demonstrated commitment to public safety and victims during the rulemaking process. In a "one size fits all" compact, commissioners faced many challenges in making and voting on rules. The rule makers acted to establish rules for victims to be notified and to have the right to comment and be heard. Significant legislation is now in place that directly affects the quality of life for all of us and may make a difference in life and death. Victims make a difference in the process as policymakers and victims learn to collaborate for the protection of all.




APPA Victims Issues Committee Report February 2004


American Parole and Probation Association

Passing the ICAOS and Establishing Rules Victims Participate and Voices Heard

By Pat Tuthill, Ex-officio Victim's Representative

The ICAOS bylaws adopted at the Inaugural Commission meeting in November 2002 stated the purpose of the compact is to provide a framework for the promotion of public safety and protect the rights of victims through the control and regulation of the interstate movement of offenders in the community and manage the movement between states of adults placed under supervision and released to the community. In addition to a commissioner from each state, ex-officio representatives are also members of the Commission.

Victims issues and concerns are represented by an ex-officio victim representative. Forty-seven states and the District of Columbia are signatories to the compact. Mississippi, Massachusetts and Virginia are not members, but it is anticipated that these states will be party to the compact this year. Puerto Rico is actively working to introduce and pass the legislation.

During the first eighteen months of compact operations, victims have played a major role in the development of rules. We were able to express concern, participate in discussions and make recommendations. The commissioners listened to us, just a governors and legislators listened when we campaigned and testified letting them know how victims, families and communities are impacted by crime.

Among the issues to be addressed within twelve months after the first meeting was notice to victims and the opportunity to be heard, eligibility for transfer, collection of restitution, protection orders, and offender registration and compliance. Rules were adopted regarding these issues at the November 2003 Annual Commission meeting. Through the ex-officio victims' representative and commissioners, victims had a significant role in the development and promulgation of ICAOS rules.

Misdemeanant supervision and eligibility for transfer under the compact is a major concern and rules are being redrafted to be presented to commissioners for passage. The rule that passed at the annual meeting, November 2003 states "that all misdemeanants will be supervised. The new rule as drafted will not require supervision of all misdemeanants. Attached.

Victims' voices have been heard with the adoption of the rules, particularly rules covering:

Victim right to notification when an offender transfers to another state by notifying known victims through the State's notification authority in accordance with its own laws




2003 Annual Report for National Commission


Passing the ICAOS and Establishing Rules
Victims Participate and Voices Heard

By Pat Tuthill, Ex-officio Victims' Representative

The ICAOS bylaws adopted at the Inaugural Commission meeting in November 2002 stated the purpose of the compact is to provide a framework for the promotion of public safety and protect the rights of victims through the control and regulation of the interstate movement of offenders in the community and manage the movement between states of adults placed under supervision and released to the community. In addition to a commissioner from each state, ex-officio representatives are also members of the Commission. Victims' issues and concerns are represented by an ex-officio victim representative. I was honored to be appointed to this position. As an ex-officio member of the commission, I also serve on several committees; executive, rules, drafting, and training.

During the first eighteen months of compact operations, victims have played a major role in the development of rules. We were able to express our concerns, participate in discussions and make recommendations. The commissioners listened to us, just as governors and legislators listened when we campaigned and testified for passage of the new compact. Rules were made with consideration and recommendations given by state council victims? representatives, victim advocates, victim assistance program directors, the American Parole and Probation Association victims? issues committee as well as other victim organizations. Our voices were heard when we told of how victims, families and communities live in fear of offenders re-victimizing them or threaten public safety.

Commission bylaws require that each state establish a state council with victims? representation. Many states have established their councils and have met within the past 18 months. For those states that have not established their councils, it is imperative this be done as soon as possible. With victims serving on the state councils, victims will continue to have the opportunity to serve in an advisory capacity regarding policymaking decisions that will directly impact how offenders are released, transferred and supervised in their state and community. Only victims can truly represent the "passion" lawmakers must hear to advocate for public safety. During the next year my plan is to establish a cohesive network of the victims? representatives serving on the state councils. Through collaboration and unity we can continue to have an active role in the quality of life for our families and communities.




APPA Victims Issues Committee August 2003


THE NEW INTERSTATE COMPACT FOR ADULT OFFENDER SUPERVISION
by Pat Tuthill


"The great thing in this world is not where you stand, as in what direction you are moving." (Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., 1841-1935)

Since 1937 the Interstate Compact for the Supervision of Parolees and Probationers has provided the sole statutory for regulating the transfer of adult parole and probation supervision across state boundaries. The compact governs the travel, movement, and supervision of adult probationers and parolees from a sending state, where the convicts have been convicted, to a receiving state. The compact has virtually unchanged from its inception. When the Compact was enacted there were approximately 1,000 offenders eligible to participate in the Compact. Today, an estimated 250,000 offenders are crossing state lines. Provisions of the 1937 compact were inadequate for maintaining control of this offender population and needed to be repealed and replaced, leading to the enactment of the new legislation.

The new Interstate Compact for Adult Offender Supervision has been enacted with the required number of states passing the legislation. The new Compact is ultimately about public safety and providing structure and framework for controlled movement and offenders across state boundaries. Florida enacted the legislation in June 2001. Now that the required number of states has adopted the law, the new Compact's national implementation is under way and it will go into effect November 18, 2003. Support for the new Compact includes corrections, victims, all three branches of government and the Council of State Governments (CSG). The first meeting of the new Interstate Compact Commission, the National Commission, was held in Phoenix, AZ in November 2002. Subsequently, the Executive Committee has appointed committees to carry out critical formative duties on behalf of the Commission. The Commission, the national governing authority, will meet annually to elect the compact operating authority.

The primary goals of the new Interstate Compact include:

  • Regulating the movement and supervision of offenders throughout our nation, protecting and preserving the rights of victims. Accountability by states, enhanced through new enforcement provisions included in the Compact.
  •  Policy-making level appointment representations of all member states on a national governing commission that meets annually to elect the compact operating authorities members. Each state will appoint a commissioner who will have one vote at the National Interstate Commission. The Commission is responsible for developing Compact rules and regulations. Commission members elect an executive committee to appoint working committees, employ staff and carry out critical formative duties on behalf of the Commission.







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