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  Murder of daughter drives working mom to help change interstate criminal laws for improved public safety and victims rights.
Murder of daughter drives working mom to help change interstate criminal laws for improved public safety and victims� rights.

Tallahassee�. Pat Tuthill was an everyday career mom confronted with an unspeakable tragedy when her 23-year-old daughter Peyton was raped and murdered by an unsupervised probationer in Denver six years ago. Her will and determination "to right a wrong" and protect others from a similar fate took Pat from total despair to lobbying for public safety, accountability, and victims� rights.(See Peyton Tuthill Annual Award right)

Pat Tuthill championed the new law titled the Interstate Compact for the Supervision of Adult Offenders (ICAOS) (http://www.adultcompact.org/) under the leadership of Executive Director, Don Blackburn and ICAOS Chair, David Guntharp, Arkansas Commissioner. The new law was passed in June 2002 and went into effect August 1, 2004. It strengthens and replaces an outdated and "toothless" 1937 law with one that has sole statutory authority recognized by the courts to control an estimated 250,000 parolees and probationers who move state-to-state. The new law added new opportunities for victims and their families to be notified and to comment on the movement of parolees and probationers, due in large part to Pat �s effort and persistence. "The sacrifices we made as we supported the new compact at times were overwhelming but you and Peyton were the reason we kept going on. Yours and our journey was long and hard but worth it." � Don Blackburn, Executive Director, ICAOS.

Pat Tuthill left her previous career as an executive to lobby full-time so she could help convince each state in the country to support new legislation for monitoring and supervising parolees and probationers who move across state lines. She personally visited states, spoke at national legislative conferences, telephoned and emailed legislators, governors and correctional officials throughout the country.

The annual ICAOS Peyton Tuthill award is given for outstanding leadership and service and partially reads, "Peyton Tuthill became the icon during the drafting of this Compact and constantly reminded us of our mission. Her story serves as a constant reminder of what perpetuates the Compact as a valuable tool to public safety."(See photo above).

Pat recently launched the non-profit Peyton Tuthill Foundation to assist crime victims and homicide survivors. by www.peytontuthill.org. She just completed a lengthy manuscript detailing her tragedy and spiritual journey in helping to write the new national law to make our families safer. Pat is seeking a publisher for the book with proceeds going to the foundation.


media@peytontuthill.org
www.peytontuthill.org







Media Contact Information

Primary contacts:
E-Mail:media@peytontuthill.org
Mailing:Peyton Tuthill Foundation
for Victim's Rights
P.O. Box 3144
Tallahassee, FL 32303
www.peytontuthill.org




New Compact Law

The new law is titled the Interstate Compact for the Supervision of Adult Offenders(ICAOS). It replaces an outdated 1937 law with provisions that were inadequate for maintaining control of an estimated 250,000 parolees and probationers who move from one state to another today. The new Interstate Compact is ultimately about public safety and providing a structure and framework for controlled movement and supervision of offenders across state lines. It also incorporates for the first time, opportunities for victims and their families to be notified and comment.

Lack of accountability and enforcement authority plagued the old compact; it was referred to as the toothless tiger. The compact now has sole statutory authority recognized by the courts. The new National Commission comprised of a commissioner from each member states and territories may impose sanctions, fines and bring legal action against states that are non-compliant in the tracking and supervision of parolees and probationers relocating in states other than where they are convicted.

The provisions of new Interstate Compact law went into effect on August 1st, 2004. During the past year a web-based information system has been designed to track and monitor offenders transferring from one state to another state, ensuring timely information is available to protect the public and notify victims. The new Compact standardizes information and establishes uniform procedures and forms. Resources have been devoted to conduct training for correctional officials, law enforcement, attorneys general and judges throughout the nation to understand the significance of compliance with the law to protect lives. Adequate funding has been established with each state assessed an annual contribution based on the offender population it transfers to other states.

Every state has a right to know when a parolee or probationer moves into its state to protect its communities. Accountability demands enforcement.





Criminal Stats

Bureau of Justice Statistics
In 2003:
-There were a total of 6.9 million people on probation, in jail or prison (1 of every 32 adults).
-There were 2,232,117 people behind bars on any given day (1,470,045 state and federal inmates in prisons and 762,072 in jail). Therefore, there were 4.7 million on probation or 2-1 vs. inmates. It is the most widely used system in criminal justice.

In 2001:
-53% of jail inmates were on probation, parole or pretrial release at the time of arrest.
-49% of all probationers had been convicted of a felony
-51% of those entering parole were mandatory releases from prison as a result of a sentencing statue or good time provision.

(Full report available at www.oip.usdoj.govbjs with state statistics).

Report of the Re-Entry Policy Council November 2004

-97% of those incarcerated in prisons will be released to our communities.

-650,000 people are released annually from prison.

-7,000,000 people are released annually from jails.

-3 out 4 offenders released have a substance abuse problem.

-1 out of 3 have some form of physical or mental disability.

- There has been a fourfold increase in number of offenders released from prison and jail over the past 20 years .

-52% of the nearly two-thirds of state prisoners who are rearrested within 3 years will return to prison for a new crime or parole violation.

-American taxpayers spent $20 billion for corrections in 2002, up from $9 billion in 1982. Spending on corrections over the past 15 years has increased more than any other major spending category, with the possible exception of health care spending.

(Source: www.reetnrypolicy.org)

Recidivism

-Two-thirds of the people who leave prisons are rearrested within a few years.- (New Strategies for Curbing Recidivism, The New York Times, January 21, 2005)

-Four out of every 5 state prison inmates are repeat offenders and offenders on parole, probation or pretrial release commit nearly 700,000 additional violent crimes each year according to the FBI.- (Getting Away with Murder and Other Violence Karl Zinsmeister.-(The American Enterprise), Crime busting Tips for Clinton, Washington Times, February 1, 1996.)

-39% of jail inmates in 2002 had served 3 or more prior sentences to incarceration or probation. -(BJS Profile of Jail Inmates, 2002)

-53% of jail inmates were on probation, parole or pretrial release at the time of arrest. BJS (Criminal Offender Statistics, 2001)

-Some 300,000 probationers are officially listed as absconders which means essentially, they are out there, hiding in view, flaunting the laws, and ignoring the system. (Community Corrections Michael Tonry, February 2004.)

-Annual criminal justice expenditures for police, prisons, probations and courts have risen to $167 billion.- (Congress Prepares to Tackle Prisoner Recidivism, The Wall Street Journal, January, 14, 2005)

(Office of Justice Program Partnerships for Safer Communities: www.ojp.usdoj.gov)

The annual report "Prison and Jail Inmates at Midyear 2004" collected from National Prisoner Statistics counts and the Annual Survey of Jails in 2004 shows:
*The Nation's prisons and jails incarcerated 2.1 million persons.
*In both jails and prisons, there were 123 female inmates per 100,000 women in the U.S. compared with 1,348 male inmates per 100,000 men.
*A total of 2,477 state prisoners were under the age of 18.
*The nubmer of inmates in custody in local jails rose by 22,689; in state prisons by 15,537; and in federal prisons by 10,095.






Quotes about Pat Tuthill

You have made such a difference with the work on the Federal Interstate Compact Law.--Kim DeChant, Denver County Victims Advocate

One thing I can say with certainty is that you have done much good for many people over the last six years. The reason for your involvement is tragic, but you are to be commended for making good come of evil--Kermit Humphries, National Institute of Corrections (NIC)

I remember being with you and Tim during those early days . . you and Peyton were the reason we kept going on. Your's and our journey was long and hard but worth it.--Don Blackburn, Executive Director, Interstate Compact.

I want to thank you for letting us tell your story in our newsletter. Many people have called and emailed how the story touched their life and what it meant to them. Again, Peyton is still touching hearts! "Anything I can do to help, is what I'll do. When you meet a victim who became a warrior, you follow! Pat is an inspiration for life!"--Anna R. Tangredi, Director, Texas Crime Victim Clearinghouse

I am so thankful that you have been a part of my personal and professional life over the past five years. You have been an inspiration and an encouragement to me and others.--Ann Hyde, Interstate Compact Commissioner, South Carolina.

Peyton Tuthill became the icon during the drafting of this Compact and constantly reminded us of our mission. Her story serves as a constant reminder of what perpetuates the Compact as a valuable tool to public safety. Her name will honor the recipient of this award as one who has provided dedicated service to the success of the Compact and its mission.--Inscription on the National Commission on the Interstate Compact Award awarded each year to the individual who demonstrated exceptional leadership and service to the compact. The award is the ultimate compliment to the dedication of those who look out for the safety of others.

"Pat Tuthill is passionate without being acrimonious. Her calm but insistent attention to the victims of crime coupled with her poignant personal experience made her a leading voice in the establishment and development of the Interstate Compact on Adult Offender Supervision." --Gerald VandeWalle,Chief Justice North Dakota





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